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The 2019 Booker Prize Shortlist

The good people who administer the Booker Prize gave us seven weeks to read as many of the 2019 longlisted titles as we could between the release of the longlist on July 24th and the reveal of the shortlist on September 3rd. I went at the list with gusto, although with fall US publication dates for some of the books, time constraints and too many other things on my reading list, I only read seven of the 13 longlisted titles before the September 3rd shortlist reveal.

I was sufficiently taken with several of the books I read that I was really looking forward to the shortlist announcement, so much so that thought about setting my alarm to watch the press conference live at 5 am East Coast time last Tuesday. It turns out, though, that while I am crazy, I am not quite that crazy, and so I settled for looking the shortlist up online as soon as I woke up that morning.

The six books on the 2019 Booker Prize shortlist are:

10 Minutes, 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak -- A murder…
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The 2019 Booker Prize Longlist

Two amazing things happened at the beginning of the week. The first was that the paralyzing heat wave that had pummeled Connecticut for several days ended. After an evening, night and morning of thunderstorms and torrential rain, the weather turned glorious. Second, and arguably even more exciting, the 2019 Booker Prize longlist was released just after midnight UK time on July 24th.

For those of you who may have missed my gleeful posts from years past about this seminal event, let me begin by stating that the Booker Prize is nothing less than the leading literary award for fiction in the English-speaking world. First awarded in 1969, the Booker Prize is open to writers of any nationality and is awarded to the best novel of the year written in English and published in the United Kingdom or Ireland.  The rules of the Booker Prize limit the number of books a publisher can submit, based on that publisher's previous Booker success. Publishers whose books have not made the longlist ove…

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